Defence In Depth  an interactive & participatory article series for the Telegraph
Hanna Kainulainen (Art Direction, Design, Programming [02],Creative), Anaïs Mims (AD, Design,Creative), Zhenqing Du (Design), Sam Moppett (Design, Developer), David Stevenson (Developer) Dominic Nicholls (Author)


Defence in Depth is an exploration into the role of the UK in the future of warfare.
A Series of 5 installment created weekly with an aim to make the audience move away from existing solely as a passive observer. 

Variety

The Defence in Depth was an intense and fast paced project realised on a tight time scale while simultaneously incorporating a broad range of details to consider. The first aim of the project was to create an easily approachable series catering to wider audiences as warfare, especially such complex and in detail series as this, is often thought as catering to a niche audience already interested in the topic. This was achieved by creating an interactive series where each installment had its own participatory element.  The project took our team from visiting a futuristic tank building facility, to learning to code (through the night) and build a fighter pilot test game measuring memory and reaction speed.


01 Cyberwar
02 The last pilot
03 The Tank
04 The Navy
05 The Future of War

   

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Each of the installments included new ways to make the audience participate. 

The Cyber Warfare included a hidden coded message within the article, which gave the reader
coordinates and the date to an exclusive drinks event in Central London.
The Last Pilot included an in-house built interactive game mimicing fighter pilot exams. 
The Navy  included a strategic game of choice in naval warfare designed by the Telegraph’s war correspondant.
The Tank included a 360 viewing tool of a WW2 tank. 

The Future of War included tactical games to share. 



Research and Development
The project started by an in depth exploration and research into past, present and future warfare and how it has been presented throughout the times. A desicion was made to actively avoid referencing known wartime posters as the project is about the past, present and future war and not restricted to one.  From a purely visual starting point, the initial inspiration was drawn from WW1 topography and advancement maps. These visual elements gave the possibility to explore the topics with purely abstract elements while still referencing war time visual elements.



An important aspect of the project was to consider the political implications of war in modern times.




Finding the right way to visually portray warfare is a dedicate process of finding a balance between



From a purely visual starting point, the insiration was found from WW1 topography maps and tank tire textures. These visual elements gave the possibility to explore the topics with purely abstract elements while still referencing war time visual elements.












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